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| 08 December, 2013 09:28

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Does seeing faces create personal sympathy? Some examples of art and documentation.

| 22 March, 2012 10:28

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/22/world/americas/mexican-art-project-puts-faces-on-crimes-toll.html?ref=world

 

Does looking into their faces change our behavior? Can it make us braver? More tolerant? Change our minds politically? 

 

May I remind you of Tuol Sleng http://www.tuolsleng.com/ the photographic museum of Pol Pots deliberate massacre? Or the documentation of victims in the camps of the Nazi Holocaust? 

 

Perhaps our sympathies are not so easy to engender. Perhaps they never have been. 

Why You Need an Art Evaluator

| 14 March, 2012 15:07

... (Original Post)

An art evaluator can save you money and some embarrassment. The purchase of art for investment is tricky. I have authenticated a Warhol print bought for $200 and sold for $7 thousand. I have had to inform clients that the artist whose work they were interested in purchases was probably laundening money for the mob. 

A good art evaluator has a background in art history, including a knowledge of art techniques, research methods and the art market. 

Gunter Sachs: Bought Warhols "out of pity" and made a fortune

| 13 March, 2012 12:29

... (Original Post)

 

The motives for collecting art vary widely. Gunter Sachs' collection for sale, expected to reap huge returns on his initial investment. 

Dear God: Jacques Derrida

| 12 March, 2012 12:38

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/10/world/americas/bernardo-pazs-inhotim-is-vast-garden-of-art.html?_r=1&hp

 

"For now, he seems more concerned with luring the masses to Inhotim to see works like “Restore Now,” a mammoth send-up of academic norms by the Swiss artist Thomas Hirschhorn, in which texts by French philosophers like Jacques Derrida and Gilles Deleuze (yes, the ones many people pretended to read in college) are interspersed with images of mutilated bodies."  At one point in my life I was married to an intelletual (See Man in Glasses, Unamused on my Website www.pattaylorfineart.net) and tried to read Derrida. It was impossible. 

"Islamic Art"=stolen art

| 10 March, 2012 15:03

"Anger mixed with contempt simmers silently in Iran, Syria or Turkey. It is rarely vented in the international arena, if only because internal political problems make it impossible. In some cases, corruption and the lack of individual freedom needed to expose outrage publicly facilitate the wrecking of monuments. It would take a very courageous man to stand up in Uzbekistan and shout that artifacts, including glazed tile revetments, are dispatched to Western auctions."

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/10/arts/10iht-melikian10.html?pagewanted=2&src=recg

 

Ever wonder how the Ishtar Gate came to Berlin? We think of curators of museums, art historians (such as I) are above the nasty games of looting. Think again. The precious pages of religious texts, the Holy Qu'uran, the word of Allah as dictated to Muhammad ripped from their bindings and displayed as discreet "art objects" is purely criminal.

In memory of Leslie

| 10 March, 2012 12:51

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/10/us/austin-proud-of-eccentricity-loses-a-favorite.html?ref=todayspaper

 

Keep Austin Weird is the rallying cry of this amazing city that is my home. Leslie Cochran, or just Leslie, rode around town on a bicycle with a small box dwelling attached, wearing a thong and high heels. He ran for Mayor several times.  There is another guy who rides a bike naked (except for a cup), but Leslie was special. Part con artist, part visionary...We all mourn him and anyone in Austin who doesn't isn't reallyl an Austinite. 

Unsettling Places and Questions about photography

| 08 March, 2012 17:44

http://www.npr.org/blogs/pictureshow/2012/03/06/148037544/unmarked-ordinary-scenes-with-unsettling-stories

 

I had the privilege of studying with Garry Winogrand at The University of Texas at Austin. Our crtiques were hardcore events: all of us baby-faced students standing around chainsmoking and trying to look tough. We were all doing the street photography that Garry was such a fantastic example of. He made us look and look and look at the history of photography, so we knew about Atget and Cartier-Bresson long before it was fashionable.

Garry would stride back and forth in front of the board where our black and white pictures were tacked up. The world according to Garry: If it's not in the picture, it's not in the picture. If it is in the picture, it only exists in the picture. He was the living embodiment of "The Intentional Fallacy. We couldn't talk about the context of the event, we couldn't say what we "meant" to do or what the image "meant" to us. As Garry would growl, "if it's in the work, it's in the work."

That is what I find so troubling about this series of images. Without the identification of the series, would there be anything untoward about these scenes. Could one not--as in the work of Cindy Sherman--simply fabricate a scene and a back-story?

 

I'm with Garry on this: If it's not in the work, it's not in the work.

 

Damn, Damn, Damn the Greek Austerity!

| 08 March, 2012 17:09

http://www.npr.org/2012/03/08/148225343/with-cutbacks-greeks-say-antiquities-are-at-risk

 

The Greek sites were under-protected two decades ago because the government was poor. Now horrendous austerity measures are resulting in wholesale looting of the heritage of Mycenean and Greek cultural riches. Support the Greeks by traveling to Greece!

Steve Jobs: One of greatest artists of the last twenty years

| 07 March, 2012 19:12

http://www.informationweek.com/news/global-cio/interviews/231900287?cid=SBX_iwk_related_commentary_Macintosh&itc=SBX_iwk_related_commentary_Macintosh

 

"Good enough" is not good enough.